Photography

Our Curriculum Intent 

 

It is a common misconception that Performing Arts is for those who want to be performers on stage, screen or other forms of media.  It undoubtedly supports these career areas but is, in fact, a subject concerned with the development of transferrable skills that are relevant to all areas of life, in terms of personal and social awareness and future employability, whatever the ultimate career choice. 

Consequently, the Performing Arts curriculum at Clayton Hall involves imagination and feelings and helps us to make sense of the world. Performing Arts is a creative and cultural activity. The language of theatre is international, understood by everyone. It provides an opportunity for students to explore the world of people from other places, times and cultures, and to examine differences and similarities with their own environment. Performing Arts has its own history and body of work, much of which has a unique and important place in our cultural life. Creativity, empathy and cooperation are the foundation to our Performing Arts curriculum at Clayton, providing the starting point for students to explore theatre. We use devising and students’ natural curiosity and creativity to encourage them to explore the world around them; what has gone before, what the future may bring and what is happening right now. We study the influential styles of Trestle Theatre, Stanislavski and Brecht to offer a rich and diverse curriculum which develops students’ performance skills and theatrical literacy. We provide students with further cultural capital through meaningful text choices, some with thought-provoking themes and others exploring the delights of making an audience laugh. We offer students the opportunity to be collectively creative, to explore ideas and attitudes and to feel the wonder of performing. 

Through the Performing Arts curriculum, we choose to teach our students: 

  • The impact theatre has had on culture and how it can be used to both entertain and provoke.  
  • The visceral power of performance on the actor and audience. 
  • How to harness their creativity and express themselves through performance and design. 
  • How to express and understand emotions in both themselves and others.  
  • To critically analyse and evaluate performance and design; skills crucial to the understanding of our multi-media world.  
  • Skills for life, such as vocal and body language skills for public speaking, confidence, dedication and teamwork which will underpin their futures. 

At Clayton Hall, students study Drama at KS3 and then can study Performing Arts at KS4.  At this level, students can choose either a broad spectrum of subject disciplines to study or can focus into more specific areas.  The choices are Acting, Dance, Musical Theatre, Lighting, Sound, Set, Props and Costume design. 

Equally important to the course is the development of inter-personal skills that will contribute to the development of resilient and well-rounded students. Students will learn how to adapt to change and accept responsibility for their progress. SEND and PP students are at the core of this planning.  

We aim to enable students to be responsible, independent and confident photographers to enable them the best opportunity to reach their next stage of learning (RIC). Each student will be challenged to adapt and apply their skills across a range of situations and disciplines. This gives students the best opportunity to showcase their talent and develop their skills.  

 

Gold Standard Teaching and Learning in Photography 

Gold Standard Teaching and Learning in Performing Arts Goal Orientated (Planning for Progress)  

  • Prep 4 Learning Task at the start of every lesson, directly harnessing the skills of RIC (resilience, independence and confidence). 
  • Blooms, learning objectives displayed clearly.  
  • Retrieval and memory skills are central to all tasks undertaken. 
  • Students understand the Big Picture, what they are learning and why.  
  • Links to the 5 R’s (responsibility, resilience, reflection, resourcefulness and reasoning). 
  • Use of digital learning tools to support student autonomy, reflection and meta-cognitive processes. 
  • Highly effective and varied questioning.  

Open dialogue (Feedback for improvement).    

  • Regular assessment and feedback.  
  • Literacy marking in line with the Academy Policy  
  • Student response to feedback (DIRT) using green pen.  
  • Self and peer-assessment used to develop independence.  
  • Progress tracked on student’s assessment maps as well as within teacher nudge books.  

What forms do assessments take? Assessment of the students’ work, skills and knowledge is made using a combination of: 

  • Performances  
  • Whole class, group or paired discussions.  
  • Self-assessment and peer assessment.  
  • Reflection on own working  
  • Teacher questioning  
  • Links with other subject assessments.   

IMPACT: Our curriculum is designed to  

  • support the growth of the individual 
  • allow students to develop several essential skills to support their success in both their academic and future careers 
  • enable our students to grow into more rounded and self-aware young adults. 

Our expectations are that students consistently challenge themselves and take risks in the creation of a variety of performances for different target audiences both within and outside the curricular lessons.  Students are actively encouraged to transfer the skills they learn to other lessons across the curriculum and in the real world.   

Learning Environment  

  • Positive Learning Environment created by mutually respectful relationships.  
  • Adults consistently model the values of the school and support curriculum intent.  
  • Reward effort and resilience by providing opportunities for students to speculate, investigate, and make mistakes.  
  • Pride is shown in their learning through the presentation of work.  

Differentiation for Challenge and support  

  • Data and student information is used to plan for individual needs.   
  • Stretch and challenge is provided for High Ability students.  
  • Oracy in the classroom is a priority; students respond to questions or contributions in full sentences (talk for writing).  
  • Additional intervention provided for those who need it. 
  • Starter Task- Self- directed lesson planning in every lesson.  
  • Blooms, learning objectives displayed clearly through flow of assessment and photography cycle.  
  • Students understand the road map, what they are learning, why and how it links into their project and course.  
  • Students have their own personal channel in which to ask questions, seek help and review their progress. These are regularly updated.  
  • Links to RIC (Resilience, Independence and Confidence) through student self-regulation and planning.   
  • Highly effective and varied questioning, 121 meetings held between teacher and students.  

Open dialogue (Feedback for improvement).    

  • Regular assessment and feedback through Teams linked to Flow of assessment.  
  • Literacy marking in-line with school policy (analysis within digital sketchbook).  
  • Student respond to feedback by completing nudges, this is RAG rated and directed by the ‘Photography Cycle’ (Bi- Weekly, flow of assessment in Teams).  
  • Self and peer-assessment used to develop independence.  
  • Progress tracked on student’s assessment maps within the Flow of assessment (Teams) 

Learning Environment  

  • Positive Learning Environment created by mutually respectful relationships.  
  • Adults consistently model the values of the school and support curriculum intent.  
  • Reward effort and resilience by providing opportunities for students to speculate, investigate, and make mistakes.  
  • Pride is shown in their learning through the presentation and submission of work.  

Differentiation for Challenge and support  

  • SEN and disadvantaged students will receive a higher frequency of support in lessons, shorter staged tasks and specific differentiated support materials posted to their channels. 
  • Data and student information is used to plan for individual needs. Students are aware of their progress and discuss regularly with the teacher.  
  • Stretch and challenge is provided for High Ability students through the ‘Flow of Assessment’.  
  • Oracy in the classroom is a priority; students respond to questions or contributions in full sentences (talk for writing).  
  • Additional intervention provided for those who need it through the flow of assessment and supporting digital materials. 

 

 

Key Stage 4 Examination Overview 

Examination Board: Pearson/ Edexcel 

Component 1 – 30% of the qualification: Learners will develop their understanding of the performing arts by examining practitioners’ work, and the processes used to create performance. 

Component 2 30% of the qualification: Learners will develop their performing arts skills and techniques through the reproduction of acting, dance and/or musical theatre repertoire as performers or designers. 

Component 3: 40% of the qualification Learners will be given the opportunity to work as part of a theatrical group to contribute to a workshop performance as either a performer or designer in response to a given brief and stimulus 

 

What resources could I buy or borrow that will help my child? 

Revise BTEC Tech Award Performing Arts Revision Guide (pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk) 

Get a Revision Guide for the schools’ price (includes 25% discount) for the module titles listed above. 

This book can also be purchased from Amazon but for a higher price. 

 

What are the key websites or Apps that my child could use? 

www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize – BBC Bitesize has an Edexcel section where pupils can select a variety of units for learning. 

What can I do to encourage my child to take further interest in Performing Arts? 

Join in with the Academy’s Drama Club; offer to participate or help out with the annual show at The Rep Theatre; partake in the whole school musical or musical theatre show (normally occurs once a year; do music, dance or drama classes outside of school; join the New Vic Youth Theatre. 

 

What after school or other extracurricular activities are available in Performing Arts and when are they? 

Annual show at The Rep Theatre – January of every year. 

Lower School Drama Club – normally run at lunch times. 

The Treble Makers – whole school vocal group. 

Singing Lessons – various times offered during the school day. 

 

@ KS3 there is a Drama Club that operates x1 lunchtime each week. 

@ KS4, Monday and Wednesday lunchtimes, the Drama Studio is set aside for students to rehearse examination work. 

At Clayton we have a suite of digital SLR cameras and computers for students to use so purchasing expensive equipment is not necessary. We do advise that students buy their own SD card and SD card reader to aid them in their lessons. Cameras can be borrowed from school in agreement with the Teacher.  

 

What are the key websites or Apps that my child could use? 

All course materials including recorded tutorials can be found in the class photography team.  

Each student has a personal channel with stepped instructions to help their progress.  

All Course information can be found at www.OCR.com under art and design. 

Editing software www.Pixlr.com  

Storage/ Filing Office 365 and One Drive 

Techniques- You tube ‘how to’ Videos 

Research- www.Pinterest.com 

 

 

What can I do to encourage my child to take further interest in Photography? 

Take a camera with you wherever you go and encourage your son/ daughter to take photographs. 

 

What after school or other extracurricular activities are available in Photography and when are they? 

Monday GCSE catch-up intervention room 5 

 

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